Category Archives: Kata

Kata Cups: Solving Kata Problems Since 2014

First: credit for this concept goes 100% to Llewellyn Falco. I was running one of my favorite Javascript coding exercises in 2014ish at a Utah Software Craftsmanship meetup, and Llewellyn not only showed up, but he also solved the problem I was having with my presentation style.

The Problem

Who’s run a guided code kata for more than three people?

Need a definition for a guided code kata? Start here, then add the idea of one person either displaying steps to follow and/or performing the steps on a large screen in front of several people. Guided katas are commonly performed at user groups, lunch learnings, or at a local coding dojo meetup.

Back to my original question: who’s run a guided kata for more than three people?

Still reading? Then you probably relate to the problem. The problem is:  how can you tell when a reasonable percentage (or 100%) of the room is ready for the next step?

In my case, I was leading a guided kata for a room of around thirty people. Even with about half the room doing the exercise in pairs, I was spending a lot of time asking, “Who needs more time?”.

The Solution (hint: it’s kata cups)

Cut a notch in two sides of some paper cups, and ask people to put them on their laptop screens when they finish the current step of the kata. When a significant agreed upon group of folks are ready, call out “Cups down!” and move on to the next step.


When you don’t have any cups handy, try having everyone fix a sticky note to the top of their laptop. Post-its work in a pinch, but the cups are more reliable– and fun.

The use of kata cups has spread throughout the office at work. It’s fun to see something so simple aid in the success of a lean-agile culture. So many things we do are about visibility and collaboration and finding the right solution just-in-time. Kata cups are no exception.

Legacy Code Kata v3.0

You’ve been patient. Some of you have been patient. Last week on Thursday night, I presented Legacy Dependency Kata v2.2 at the SLC .NET User Group Meetup. You’ll notice the name change since then.

But wait– don’t know what a code kata is? Start here.

I’d like to give a quick thank you to the crowd that night and the one the day before at HealthEquity during one of our Lunch Learning sessions. You all are fantastic. Thanks for the great feedback!

What’s different? Not much, to be honest. Also, in some ways, a lot. But what I realized as I was going through the slides one final time, was this: this IS a major revision. I just didn’t realize it while going through all the multiple iterative changes.

What hasn’t changed? Legacy Code Kata 3.0 is still a code kata about dealing with dependencies in legacy code and getting it ready for unit testing. It still uses the same seed code as previous versions, and you can find that here on GitHub.


So, what makes this version so great? Let me lay it out for you:

  1. Lost the lame presentation theme. I thought I accomplished this with v2.0. NOPE. You’re welcome.
  2. The intro slides have been honed down to only those 100% essential, and they were also prettied up, and some new notes added.
  3. Added the Kata Barometer (patent pending (not actually (maybe))). At any time you always know what state your tests and build should be in.
  4. Broke up quite a few slides that were too complicated and/or the font was too small to read effectively. Much more Kata Cup friendly now. What’s a Kata Cup? Maybe in a future post. Stop changing the subject!

If you want to see for yourself why this version is so much better, check out the old versions: Version 1.0 or Version 2.0.

Here it is.

Legacy Dependency Kata v2.0

Well, well, well. Look what the samurai dragged in. An updated version of my Legacy Dependency Kata. I’ll have to update the Coding Kata Resources page.


I’m not proud to admit that there even was a v1.0 at the moment. Let me explain.

Just over two years ago, I was experimenting with writing katas, presenting at code conventions, and running a coding dojo. It turns out. I wasn’t super fantastic at any of these things. Nevertheless, I wrote a kata, ran it a few times with the kind folks in my dojo, and proceeded to share it with the delightful folks at Utah Code Camp 2014. Reviews were mixed, but overall I felt good about it.

Fast forward to the present. While planning the lunchtime learning schedule for our recent SAFe Program Increment, there was an opening, and I, ever so graciously, decided to run my Legacy Dependency Kata for folks who may not have had the chance to see it before. Upon thoroughly embarrassing myself with some of the crappiest kata slides in existence (slides even I couldn’t completely fathom), I recognized that my life would be forfeit if folks were forced to do the kata again with the same slides the following day.

I dashed to revise the slides and spent many hours on the task. When I presented the kata on the second day, it was a much more successful attempt. I’d go so far as to call it a version 1.7. I spent some more time and enlisted the advice of the ever-gracious and capable Kaleb Pedersen in finalizing v2.0. The source code is still the same. Legacy code problems from 2 years ago are still very similar to what they are today.


I think the new slides do their job. Could this kata still be better? Without a doubt. Please submit your recommendations in the comments or feel free to yell at me on Twitter. I’m sure I deserve it for something.

Without further adieu, I give you Legacy Dependency Kata Version Two.

Seed code is still on GitHub: